Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Sounds That Scare Dogs — And What to Do About Them

The post Sounds That Scare Dogs — And What to Do About Them by Arden Moore appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Dogs don’t need to see something scary to turn into puddles of panic. There are tons of sounds that scare dogs, unfortunately. Certain sounds that scare dogs can cause them to pace, drool, shake, shadow you or desperately seek a safe refuge like inside the bathtub.

Some dogs with noise phobias can become petrified with fear even before the dreaded sound arrives, because they pick up on pre-sound warning cues.

“My dog, Rusty, is terrified of the smoke detector in our kitchen,” says Nicholas Dodman, BVMS, professor emeritus at Tufts University’s School of Veterinary Medicine, a board-certified veterinary behaviorist and lead veterinarian at the Center for Canine Behavior Studies in Salisbury, Connecticut. “He has learned that turning on our indoor grill may cause the smoke alarm to go off, so he starts to shake and tremble with fear when he sees us bring out the indoor grill. So, I distract him in another room while my wife, Linda, works the indoor grill. Rusty has learned what we call a behavioral chain, a common occurrence in dogs with noise phobias.”

What are some common sounds that scare dogs?

Dog staring.

What sounds scare dogs? Photography ©Sonja Rachbauer| Getty Images

By definition, veterinarians and animal behaviorists use the term “noise phobia” to describe the intense and irrational fear displayed by some dogs to certain sounds. It is important to make the distinction that fear is a normal emotional response to a real or perceived threat or situation, such as dreading the anticipated pain from a vaccination needle. However, fear can escalate to a phobia, an exaggerated and irrational response that can completely emotionally cripple a dog.

Topping the list of sounds that scare dogs:

  1. thunderstorms
  2. fireworks
  3. loud trucks
  4. gunshots
  5. people yelling
  6. squawking pet parrots
  7. security alarms
  8. smoke detectors

But your dog may develop a noise phobia to more unusual sounds based on past experience, such as the wheels of a skateboard, the buzzer on a game show on TV or the popping of bubble wrap used to pad packages.

Sounds that scare dogs are a pretty common problem

What are dogs scared of? The vacuum cleaner makes the list. Photography ©igorr1 | Getty Images.

Sounds that scare dogs aren’t uncommon, unfortunately. Photography ©igorr1 | Getty Images.

Sounds that scare dogs and escalate into noise phobia in dogs are more common than you may realize. Dr. Dodman estimates that close to 50 percent of dogs have some signs of fear and anxiety to sounds, sights and situations. But there is no study known that breaks down the percentage of dogs with fears or phobias to perceived scary sounds.

“Fear and anxiety rank as the No. 1 issue with dogs,” says Dr. Dodman, who ran the Animal Behavior Clinic at Tufts for more than two decades and is a best-selling pet author. “No one knows for sure, but it may have to do with their physical size, shape, structure, their temperaments and/or environmental influences.”

Most of Dr. Dodman’s canine clients being treated for thunderstorm phobia tended to be large and hairy. He has treated more breeds like German Shepherd Dogs, Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers and Bernese Mountain Dogs for noise phobias than he has for breeds like Greyhounds, Shih Tzus or Dachshunds.

“A dog’s coat is a perfect receptacle for an electric charge, especially dogs with long-haired coats,” he notes. “Things and animals can get statically charged in a storm.”

Signs of fear

Pug

Is your dog hiding? He might have a noise phobia. Photography ©Alexandr Zhenzhirov | Getty Images

How a dog reacts to a fearful sound also depends on whether or not his best friend – you — are in the room or the dog is home alone.

“Clinical signs can differ, but if you are with the dog when the noise occurs, the typical behavior is for the dog to go into Velcro mode and be close to you, even press into you as the dog shakes and trembles with fear,” Dr. Dodman says. “But if you are not present to provide solace to the dog, separation anxiety is also usually present. These dogs are in extreme anxious states and tend to vocalize, have accidents on the floor and desperately try to hide or escape what they regard to be a house of horrors.”

Other signs of sounds that scare dogs can include: inappropriate chewing (your shoes, the television remote, etc.), drooling, excessive barking, diarrhea and vomiting, digging (including the living room rug), panting heavily, pacing and displaying “whale eye” — a panicky look in which you can see the whites of the eyes.

Tools to calm a noise phobia

Scary Sounds

While there is no one cure or one-size-fits-all solution to minimize sounds that scare dogs has or even make them disappear altogether, you do have plenty of tools at your disposal.

  1. For starters, strive to be calm around your dog and avoid baby talk or panicky tones. Dogs are masters at reading our emotional states. And, consult a professional dog behaviorist or dog trainer to help modify your dog’s behavior. Keep in mind that behavior modification techniques build on small but steady successes, and you need to be patient. Never yell at your dog for his fear-related destructive behavior, as your dog could start to associate the loud noises with a punishment, too.
  2. As for products, work with your veterinarian to see if these may aid the reaction in your dog: Anti-anxiety vests, ThunderShirts, anti-static jackets or even towel wrapping your dog to help him feel less anxious or frightened. If your dog is afraid of storms, you can try rubbing his coat with antistatic laundry dryer sheets.
  3. Pheromone sprays and diffusers. These commercial products emit dog-appeasing pheromones that help some dogs calm down in stressful or scary situations.
  4. Soothing music or white noise to help block out the source of the fear-causing sound.
  5. Soundproof a crate or safe room for your dog to go to before a storm strikes.
  6. Some dogs require supplements or prescription medication to help them cope with noise phobias, especially to thunderstorms. The popular go-to medications prescribed by veterinarians include clonidine, clomipramine, fluoxetine, benzodiazepine and Prozac. Keep in mind that your veterinarian may recommend a combination of these drugs or may prescribe for use before a storm arrives to minimize your dog’s response. Go to a holistic veterinarian if you prefer more homeopathic solutions like herbs, essential oils, Bach flower remedies or Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).
  7. Dr. Dodman shares one final key bit of advice: Don’t wait to get your pup or young dog treated for a noise phobia. “If your 10-month-old dog is starting to show signs of fear to a sound like thunder, don’t dismiss it and think you can just live with his pacing, because trust me, it will get worse if unchecked. I guarantee that. Get help sooner than later.”

When it comes to hearing, dog ears rule

We share some organizations who help make life better for deaf dogs. Photography ©Azret Ayubov | Getty .

Dogs have much better hearing than humans. Photography ©Azret Ayubov | Getty .

When it comes to a hearing contest, dogs have us beat, paws down. On average, there are about 12 muscles per canine ear that can be tilted, turned, raised and lowered to zero in on sounds at greater distances and wider frequencies than human ears.

Dogs can hear sounds within 67 to 45,000 hertz range as compared to people who can hear sounds within a range of 63 to 23,000. Hertz (Hz) is a measure of sound frequency or cycles per second.

That explains why your dog can be snoozing in an upstairs bedroom but hear you open a bag of potato chips in the kitchen and come bounding your way.

Thumbnail: © mattjeacock |Getty Images & © GlobalP | Getty Images.

About the author

Arden Moore, the Pet Health and Safety Coach, is a pet behavior consultant, master certified pet first-aid instructor, author and host of the Oh, Behave Show on Pet Life Radio. Learn more at ardenmoore.com.

Editor’s note: This article appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you! 

Read more related articles on Dogster.com:

The post Sounds That Scare Dogs — And What to Do About Them by Arden Moore appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

How to Handle Bites & Stings in Dogs

The post How to Handle Bites & Stings in Dogs by Catherine Ashe appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Most of us have been there — an innocent frolic outside with our canine companion leads to a swollen face and hives. Just like their human counterparts, dogs are susceptible to insect and animal bites and stings. These are the ones with cause for concern.

Dog stung by a bee or dog stung by a wasp

Two bulldogs dressed up as bees.

Dogs dressed as bees are cute – but dogs stung by bees sure aren’t! Photography by John Mcallister/Thinkstock.

These are extremely common in the spring and summer when insects are the most active. Some dogs will suffer absolutely no ill effects other than mild redness, swelling and discomfort at the site of a sting (much like humans). And, like humans, some dogs develop hives, facial swelling and welts. These can be managed at home with doses of diphenhydramine (brand name Benadryl). First consult your veterinarian on appropriate dosing.

In severe cases, anaphylaxis can develop. A canine having an anaphylactic reaction will begin to:

  1. copiously vomit
  2. have diarrhea
  3. may collapse

Take your dog immediately to emergency care. Your dog will be treated with epinephrine, IV fluids and other supportive care measures. The veterinarian may also recommend carrying an EpiPen for future reactions.

Spider bites on dogs

The two most common venomous spiders in the United States are the widows (Latrodectus sp.) and recluses (Loxosceles sp.). These spiders are timid and tend to live in dark, dry places. This is good for our animal friends, as they don’t come into contact as frequently. It is rare to know for certain that your dog was bitten by a spider, as these species are small and often in places where curious noses can reach but humans do not see.

Black widow spider.

Black widow spider. Photography ©stephanie phillips | Getty Images.

Widows can be lethal. Dogs are more resistant to the venom than cats, but a small dog could be in trouble. The symptoms are surprising. It can take 8 hours for signs to develop. They include:

  1. marked pain
  2. muscle cramps
  3. diarrhea and vomiting
  4. agitation and vocalizing
  5. facial tremors
  6. a rigid abdomen

Unlike recluse spiders, the wound itself often has no noticeable signs other than mild redness and swelling.

An antivenin does exist, but it is not routinely carried in veterinary clinics. It is costly, and it’s rare to confirm an actual bite. The good news is that the majority of dogs will survive a bite without antivenin. Further, some entomologists estimate that 15 percent of bites are “dry” — meaning that no venom is injected. If you suspect a widow bite, seek veterinary care.

Brown recluse spider.

Brown recluse spider. Photography ©Schiz-Art | Getty Images.

Recluse bites are different and often cause significant localized tissue damage (necrosis). The bite site might go through the following stages:

  • a small blister shows
  • the blister turns black
  • the tissue peels away

Systemic signs are uncommon. Oftentimes, wound care is needed over several days, as well as pain management and antibiotics. These bites are rarely fatal.

Snake bites on dogs

Rattlesnake.

Rattlesnake. Photography ©texcroc | Getty Images.

There are about 20 venomous snakes in the United States including rattlesnakes and copperheads. Which your dog could be exposed to depends on where you live. The severity of the bite depends on many different factors including how much venom was injected and how many bites occurred. Most emergency veterinary clinics stock antivenin appropriate for the snakes in their areas.

There are many “old school” remedies that simply do not work. Do not apply a tourniquet or ice the leg. Avoid over-the-counter pain medications. Keep calm and drive to the nearest emergency veterinary clinic.

All snake bites should be evaluated by a veterinarian. In some cases, “dry” bites do occur (no venom injected) and usually pain management is sufficient. In other cases, more aggressive measures such as IV fluids, antivenin, pain relief and close monitoring are needed. Some snake bites cause localized damage while others cause systemic effects like clotting abnormalities and seizures.

Scorpions

Scorpion

Scorpion. Photography  ©Ledzeppelinriff | Getty Images.

Only one scorpion species in the United States is thought to cause signs of systemic envenomation: the bark scorpion. Found almost exclusively in Arizona, it hides under tree bark. Symptoms are generally neurologic:

  1. rhythmic jerking
  2. flicking of the eyes
  3. marked pain both at the site and referred (pain felt elsewhere).

There is no specific antidote in dogs. Care is supportive, and death is very rare. As with any envenomation, do not panic if you suspect your dog has been stung. Seek veterinary evaluation.

Thumbnail: Photography ©kozorog | Getty Images.

About the author

Catherine Ashe is a veterinarian, mother and freelance writer residing in Asheville, North Carolina. For nine years, she practiced emergency medicine and is now a relief GP. When not working, she spends time with her family of six, reading, writing and enjoying the Blue Ridge mountains.

Editor’s note: This article appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you! 

Read more about dog health and care on Dogster.com:

The post How to Handle Bites & Stings in Dogs by Catherine Ashe appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Dog Eye Discharge — What’s Normal and What’s Not

The post Dog Eye Discharge — What’s Normal and What’s Not by Jackie Brown appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Have you ever wondered if your dog’s eye boogers are normal or not? A dog’s eyes can leak and tear for many reasons, some of which are normal and some of which are not. Tear stains are unsightly, but more importantly, dog eye discharge might indicate a problem that requires vet attention.

According to Beth Kimmitt, DVM, resident of ophthalmology at Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in West Lafayette, Indiana, a dog’s eye is always producing tears, and these tears typically drain at the corners of the eye. “Technically, a normal eye should not have any ocular discharge, but a small amount of clear discharge may be OK,” she tells us. Clear dog eye discharge might look brown and slightly crusty when it dries.

That said, some dog eye discharge is not normal. Read on to find out what’s normal and what needs a vet exam when it comes to dog eye discharge:

A dog getting his eyes examined by the vet.

Sometimes, dog eye discharge requires a vet visit. Photography by fotoedu/Thinkstock.

This type of dog eye discharge means it’s time to visit the vet.

If your dog has colored green eye discharge, yellow eye discharge or another colored eye discharge, schedule a vet appointment immediately. Other signs of problematic dog eye discharge include squinting, a red-looking eye, or if your dog is rubbing or pawing at his eye. If you think something is wrong with your dog’s eye, don’t wait too long to make that vet appointment — his eyesight could be at risk.

Abnormal eye leakage might signal a dog eye infection or other issues.

“The presence of ocular discharge is a non-specific sign,” Dr. Kimmitt says. “This means that it can be caused by a variety of ocular disorders. Common causes of dog eye discharge include ulcers, entropion, keratoconjunctivitis sicca and conjunctivitis (allergic or bacterial).” A corneal ulcer is damage to the cornea, which is the clear membrane that covers the iris and pupil.

Entropion is a condition in which the eyelid rolls inward, causing eyelashes to rub against the cornea. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (called dry eye) is dryness of the conjunctiva, which is membrane that covers the white part of the eye. Conjunctivitis (sometimes called pink eye) is inflammation of the eye. A vet exam and tests can pinpoint the cause of your dog’s abnormal eye discharge.

Certain breeds are prone to dog eye discharge.

Brachycephalic dog breeds like Pugs and Boxers might have slightly more eye leakage than other breeds due to the combination of a short nose and large, round eyes. In these breeds, some dog eye discharge might be normal, especially if it’s clear, but abnormal dog eye boogers deserve a vet visit.

Poodles and Cocker Spaniels are more prone to blocked tear ducts, too. Usually, these ducts drain the tears from your dog’s eyes out through the nose and back of the throat. With the tear ducts blocked, there’s nowhere for the tears to drain, so they spill over the eye rims and run down the face.

If you see brown tear stains, it doesn’t necessarily mean something is wrong.

“Dogs with white hair coats (like Maltese, Poodles, etc.) might show the discharge easier than other colors,” Dr. Kimmitt says. You can help minimize dog tear stains by wiping the under-eye area frequently and keeping it as dry as possible. You can also try one of the whitening products sold specifically to help with tear stains.

It’s important to keep your dog’s eye area clean.

“A soft, wet cloth can be used to gently wipe away the discharge,” Dr. Kimmitt advises. You can also use a veterinary eye cleaning product to combat dog eye discharge — just make sure it doesn’t contain any alcohol.

Plus, learn about the structure of your dog’s eyes and how to keep them healthy >>

Thumbnail: Photography by Tanantornanutra/Thinkstock.

This piece was originally published in 2017. 

About the author

Pet expert Jackie Brown has spent 20 years following her passion for animals as a writer and editor in the pet publishing industry. She is contributing writer for National Geographic’s Complete Guide to Pet Health, Behavior, and Happiness: The Veterinarian’s Approach to At-Home Animal Care (April 2019) and author of the book It’s Raining Cats and Dogs: Making Sense of Animal Phrases (Lumina Press, 2006). Jackie is a regular contributor to pet and veterinary industry media and is the former editor of numerous pet magazines, including Dog World, Natural Dog, Puppies 101, Kittens 101 and the Popular Cats Series. Prior to starting her career in publishing, Jackie spent eight years working in veterinary hospitals where she assisted veterinarians as they treated dogs, cats, rabbits, pocket pets, reptiles, birds and one memorable lion cub. She lives in Southern California with her husband, two sons and miniature poodle Jäger. Reach her at jackiebrownwriter.wordpress.com.

Read more about dog eye issues on Dogster.com:

The post Dog Eye Discharge — What’s Normal and What’s Not by Jackie Brown appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

10 Summer Dangers for Dogs — And How to Avoid Them

The post 10 Summer Dangers for Dogs — And How to Avoid Them by Sassafras Lowrey appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

The dog days of summer are opportunities for fun in the sun with Fido, but the hot summer weather also brings the following top health and safety concerns.

1. Walking dogs on hot pavement

A dog barking on a leash and harness while out for a walk.

Make sure the pavement isn’t too hot for your dog in the summer. Photography ©Page Light Studios | Thinkstock.

Walks are a great way to keep your dog physically and mentally exercised, but in the summer months they come with some specific health concerns. Emmy award-winning veterinarian Dr. Jeff Werber cautions that dog parents should pay special attention to the pavement and how hot it is. “Remember, even after dark the pavement retains heat and can injure your dog’s pads,” he says.

Not sure if it’s too hot? Place your hand on the pavement. If you have to pull your own hand away because it’s too hot for you, then it’s too hot for your dog’s paws.

Plan your dog walks for early morning hours, late afternoon or early evening, and always avoid having your dog out in the midday heat. If you must walk your dog in the heat of the day invest in booties to protect your dog’s sensitive pads from the hot pavement.

2. Riding in cars

When driving with your dog in the summer, always keep the air conditioning on for the safety and comfort of your dog. “If the car is too hot for you, then it’s too hot for your dog,” Dr. Werber explains.

Cars are dangerous places for dogs in summer heat, and dogs should never be left in a parked car, even in the shade or in a parking garage. Even with the windows cracked, temperatures inside a car increase rapidly and can quickly be fatal to your dog.

3. Leaving dogs outside

Increasingly, cities and states are instituting new legal protections for dogs that prohibit them being left outside in extreme cold or hot temperatures. In Pennsylvania, for example, people who leave dogs outside in over 90-degrees Fahrenheit heat could face steep fines or even jail time.

If for some reason your dog must be left outside, Dr. Werber advises that your dog must be provided free access to water. In addition, your dog must be able to get either natural shade or consistent shade created by an awning or other structure.

4. Brachycephalic dogs overheating

While hot weather can be dangerous for all dogs, there are particular breeds more at risk in hot weather due to breathing problems — dogs with more pushed-in faces (brachycephalic dogs) such as: Pugs, French Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, Boxers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers, Bulldogs, Shih Tzus, Pekingese, Affenpinschers, Japanese Chins, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Lhasa Apsos and Brussels Griffons.

These dogs are better off inside in air conditioning during the hottest of summer months.

Japanese Chins are particularly at risk in hot weather. Dr. Werber also cautions that “Pekingese and Lhasa Apso have more thickness around their necks than other breeds and are more inclined to having pharyngeal stenosis. This can make breathing and panting more challenging, which is why you often hear them ‘snoring.’ These breeds are more prone to overheating.”

Before traveling, check with the airlines on any pet restrictions during warm weather months.

5. Heatstroke

A dog panting outside in the summer sun.

Be on the lookout for heatstroke in dogs during warmer weather. Photography ©martin-dm | iStock / Getty Images Plus.

Dogs pant to cool down, but ongoing panting can be a sign that your dog is overheating and in distress. If your dog has been in the heat, is incessantly panting, has slowed down, appears extremely tired and doesn’t want to move, Dr. Werber cautions that the dog could be experiencing heatstroke, which can be fatal.

If you think your dog has heatstroke, get him to a veterinarian right away. While en route, Dr. Werber says to dribble water into your dog’s mouth to keep it moist and try to soak down the feet as well as the body, which should help to bring down your dog’s overall body temperature. He advises that “room temperature water is best — you don’t want to cool them down too quickly.”

6. Not drinking enough water

Year-round, but especially in the summer heat, it’s essential that your dog has constant access to fresh water. Because risk of dehydration in dogs increases in the summer heat, make sure your dog stays hydrated while you are out enjoying the warm weather. Always carry water for your dog and have a travel water bowl with you for hikes and outings, but also for neighborhood walks. Take frequent breaks to give your dog an opportunity to drink. Dr. Werber also encourages dog guardians to “soak a bandanna in water and freeze it overnight. Wrap it around your dog’s neck before a walk.”

At home, up the amount of water you give your dog, especially if you are away from the house all day. A dog water fountain is even better, as it provides lots of fresh water all day long.

7. Shaving your dog could actually be harmful

A fur coat might look hot in the summer heat, but your dog’s fur actually keeps them cool. AKC executive secretary, Gina DiNardo, explains that while it might be tempting to give your pup a cool summer trim or shave, doing so might actually be harmful.

“People tend to think that doublecoated breeds suffer more in hot weather because of the massive amounts of coat,” she says. “However, this is not the case. Their coat traps the air closest to the skin and keeps it the same temperature as their ideal body temperature. Also, if you shave a dog down to the skin, you not only increase the risk of heatstroke, but sunburn, too.”

Gina also advises that dogs who have hair instead of fur such as Poodles and Bichons can be shaved in the summer, but to keep enough coat to protect the dog’s skin from the sun.

8. Sunburn

There are a variety of canine sunscreens on the market that can help to protect your dog’s sensitive skin from sun damage. Don’t use human sunscreens on dogs, as they usually include zinc or other ingredients not safe for dogs to ingest (since dogs lick everything!).

Sunscreen is important for areas of your dog’s body that are more exposed, such as right above the nose, the belly, abdomen and groin area. Short-coated and light-colored dogs are especially at risk of sunburns. Hairless dogs should always wear sunscreen when out in the summer.

9. Ticks

Beyond being a painful nuisance, ticks can transmit serious disease to your dog including Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Make sure your dog is up-to-date on flea/tick prevention, and know what diseases ticks in your area of the country spread. Carry a tick remover, and check your dog for ticks after walks.

10. Swimming concerns

Yes, dogs can drown. No, not all dogs know how to swim. Even if your dog does know how to swim, he can get tired and, unlike humans, he doesn’t know how to do the dead man’s float to rest. Always fit your pup with a canine life vest to support his mid-section and hindquarters to keep him safe. The handle at the top also makes it easy to pull your dog out of the water if you are on a boat or paddleboard.

If you have a pool, teach your dog how to safely get in and out, so he doesn’t drown trying to get out. Dogs in pools should also be wearing a canine life vest. Brachycephalic dogs, puppies, seniors, dogs with short legs and long backs and barrel-chested dogs, in particular, should always wear a canine life vest.

Thumbnail: Photography ©Victoria Rak | Tuff Photo.

About the author

Sassafras Lowrey is an award-winning author and Certified Trick Dog Instructor. Sassafras’ forthcoming books include: “TRICKS IN THE CITY: For Daring Dogs and the Humans That Love Them,” “Healing/Heeling,” and Bedtime Stories for Rescue Dogs: William To The Rescue. Learn more at SassafrasLowrey.com

Editor’s note: This article appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you! 

Read more about summer and dogs on Dogster.com:

The post 10 Summer Dangers for Dogs — And How to Avoid Them by Sassafras Lowrey appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Monday, April 22, 2019

Silent Dog ID Tags from QALO

Designed to withstand any adventure your dog may embark on, these 100% silicone ID tags from QALO are virtually silent (hooray)!

Why is My Dog Sleeping in Bed With Me? 10 Reasons

The post Why is My Dog Sleeping in Bed With Me? 10 Reasons by Heather Marcoux appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

It’s the dilemma of the modern day dog lover: You finally find that totally washable, ultra-comfortable dog bed that manages to match both your decor and budget. You test the memory foam yourself, curling up like a dog in front of bemused pet store employees. You bring your purchase home and present it to your pooch, hoping she’ll love it. Instead, she takes one sniff before bounding up onto the only bed she’ll ever love — yours. So, why is your dog sleeping in bed with you even though there are other comfy options available?

There’s plenty of reasons why dogs can’t resist the big bed. Maybe if we understand them we’ll have a better chance of getting them out of it.

1. They’re lonely

Here’s a simple answer to, “Why is my dog sleeping in bed with me?” Dogs are like ex-boyfriends: They don’t like to sleep alone and, if you let them in your bed once, they want to get in there every night. They both make a whimpering sound when you tell them to sleep in their own bed.

2. Dogs get cold sometimes

Sometimes a dog just wants a cuddle buddy to stay warm. Photography ©molka | Getty Images.

Sometimes a dog just wants a cuddle buddy to stay warm. Photography ©molka | Getty Images.

A nice duvet and a human-shaped space heater make the big bed seem a lot cozier than the dog bed that offers nothing more than their own body heat. Why shiver by your lonesome when you can warm your cold nose on a human’s warm feet?

3. The big bed smells good

There’s a reason why there are scented candles that smell like freshly laundered sheets — it’s an amazing scent. That scent (well, preserving it) is why many humans buy their dog their own bed, but it’s also the reason why our dogs are drawn to ours.

4. The big bed smells like THEM!

Another answer to, “Why is my dog sleeping in bed with me?” Our beds smell better than theirs, but, unfortunately, that’s only true if they sleep in theirs. They may start sleeping in our bed because it smells better than theirs, but they stay because, eventually, it smells like it’s theirs.

5. Dogs love to stretch out

Bigger space might be the reason why your dog is sleeping in bed with you. Photography ©grki | Getty Images.

Bigger space might be the reason why your dog is sleeping in bed with you. Photography ©grki | Getty Images.

Many dog beds are designed with circle sleepers in mind, but if your dog doesn’t like to form a doggie doughnut when she beds down for the evening, a circular bed just isn’t going to do. The human mattress offers plenty of rectangular real estate for long, large-breed limbs to stretch out — the only drawback is the humans are often in the way!

6. They feel left out

Humans have different classifications of love — parental love, platonic love, romantic love. Dogs just love. That’s why they don’t really understand that some of the nocturnal cuddles that happen in the human bed are not for them. Nothing kills the mood like a canine à trois, so sometimes it’s better just to lock the door.

7. Dogs are entitled

What's mine is yours, right? Photography ©Nynke van Holten | Getty Images.

What’s mine is yours, right? Photography ©Nynke van Holten | Getty Images.

Another easy way to answer,”Why is my dog sleeping in bed with me?” Well, we call them Prince or Princess and then we expect them to sleep on the floor? Royalty will not be demoted, human.

8. Your sheets feel good

Most dog bed covers are made for washability, not luxury, and yet many dogs somehow recognize good quality linens. They know a high thread count when they see one, and when they see it on your bed they know their butt belongs on that Egyptian cotton.

9. They know it’s wrong

She thinks you're at work when she takes a nap in your bed. Photography ©damedeeso | Getty Images.

She thinks you’re at work when she takes a nap in your bed. Photography ©damedeeso | Getty Images.

If you’ve ever smoked a cigarette in a high school bathroom or didn’t come to a complete stop at a stop sign when there were no other cars in sight, you know how your dog feels when she’s rolling around on your bed when (she thinks) you’re at work — it’s deliciously wrong.

You also know how your high school principal or that cop who gave you the ticket felt about you — mildly annoyed.

10. But they love you

The bottom line on and the most definitive answer to, “Why is my dog sleeping in bed with me?” They just want to sleep next to their best friend, and really, how can we blame them for that?

Thumbnail: ©WebSubstance | Getty Images.

This piece was originally published in 2018.

About the author

Writer and two-time dog mom to GhostBuster and Marshmallow. Despite their movie-inspired names, Heather’s dogs aren’t in any web series — but they are on the web as the @ghostpets on Instagram. You can find Heather on Twitter.

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you!

Read more about dogs and sleeping on Dogster.com:

The post Why is My Dog Sleeping in Bed With Me? 10 Reasons by Heather Marcoux appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

New Treatment for Dogs With Arrhythmia

The post New Treatment for Dogs With Arrhythmia by Jackie Brown appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Research funded by the Morris Animal Foundation has led to a new treatment for dogs with a specific type of arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat) caused by atrioventricular accessory pathways.

Researchers modified a minimally invasive technique used in human patients to help dogs with this rare but deadly heart irregularity.

Dr. Kathy N. Wright and her colleagues at the veterinary group MedVet published the results of their study in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Their technique had a greater than 95 percent success rate in dogs with this specific type of arrhythmia.

Thumbnail: Photography ©hedgehog94 | Getty Images.

About the author

Pet expert Jackie Brown has spent 20 years following her passion for animals as a writer and editor in the pet publishing industry. She is contributing writer for National Geographic’s Complete Guide to Pet Health, Behavior, and Happiness: The Veterinarian’s Approach to At-Home Animal Care (April 2019) and author of the book It’s Raining Cats and Dogs: Making Sense of Animal Phrases (Lumina Press, 2006). Jackie is a regular contributor to pet and veterinary industry media and is the former editor of numerous pet magazines, including Dog World, Natural Dog, Puppies 101, Kittens 101 and the Popular Cats Series. Prior to starting her career in publishing, Jackie spent eight years working in veterinary hospitals where she assisted veterinarians as they treated dogs, cats, rabbits, pocket pets, reptiles, birds and one memorable lion cub. She lives in Southern California with her husband, two sons and miniature poodle Jäger. Reach her at jackiebrownwriter.wordpress.com.

Editor’s note: This article appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you! 

Read more about dog health and care on Dogster.com:

The post New Treatment for Dogs With Arrhythmia by Jackie Brown appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.