Friday, December 14, 2018

Is Smoking Weed Around Dogs Dangerous?

The post Is Smoking Weed Around Dogs Dangerous? by Dr. Eric Barchas appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

I seem to be the Internet’s go-to guy when it comes to questions about pets and marijuana — like “Is smoking weed around dogs dangerous?”

It started when I wrote a few blog posts about what to do if your dog breaks into a stash of marijuana. At around the same time, I also composed a comprehensive website with 100 articles on dog and cat diseases, syndromes and treatments. One of the covered items was marijuana intoxication. The article on marijuana really got noticed.

I have been quoted — always without permission, always without making any effort to contact me and sometimes out of context — by newspapers (including SF Weekly) and a bunch of pro-cannabis websites, which I try to ignore. I talk about canine marijuana intoxication in a straightforward and nonjudgemental way; this has unfortunately led some folks to the misconception that I endorse getting dogs stoned. For the record: I definitely do not.

Questions about marijuana and dogs

A dog jumping in the air.

Is smoking weed around dogs dangerous? Will it get dogs high? Photography by Grigorita Ko / Shutterstock.

Because of this “fame,” I receive a stream of questions about dogs (and other animals) and marijuana. Many of them are ridiculous to the point of absurdity. But not every question I receive is absurd. Consider the following one, which asks if smoking weed around dogs is dangerous:

I read Dr. Barchas’ posting about dogs ingesting marijuana by eating it, but what are the effects of a dog (in this case a 10-month, 50-pound Basset Hound) inhaling the secondhand smoke from someone who smokes marijuana in his bedroom?

Concerned Mom, NJ

So, is smoking weed around dogs dangerous?

The good news is that, unless an animal is confined in a room with extreme amounts of smoke, inhaling secondhand marijuana smoke is not likely to lead to intoxication. If this were a concern, it would be hard to walk the streets of San Francisco without catching a secondhand buzz.

However, the bigger concern here is the smoke itself. Dogs have exquisitely sensitive lungs, and smoke can damage them. If we’re talking smoking weed around dogs (or cigarettes) every day, a dog’s respiratory function can be compromised. On the other hand, if the person doing the smoking does not go overboard, doesn’t smoke every day and keeps a window open while smoking, it is not likely that much harm will come to the dog — from the smoke at least.

Dogs and marijuana — what to keep in mind

Bear in mind that although I’ve never seen a dog die from marijuana intoxication, smoking weed around dogs can have other consequences. I have seen dogs die as a direct result of their owners getting stoned. Everyone knows that intoxicated people frequently exercise poor judgment. Consider a dog I worked with several years ago. The owner’s boyfriend got stoned and decided to hang out on his apartment building’s roof with the dog. The dog sadly fell four stories and broke his back. The horrified owner elected to euthanize the dog (and, I imagine, dump her boyfriend).

So, remember that situations involving dogs and marijuana can end poorly. Everyone, please be careful. Don’t get your dogs stoned. Be cautious if and when you have been smoking. And please don’t smoke anything (cigarettes or weed) around your dog.

Thumbnail: Photography © JZHunt | Thinkstock.

This piece was originally published in 2012.

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The post Is Smoking Weed Around Dogs Dangerous? by Dr. Eric Barchas appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

DIY Recipe: Pretty Puppy Pie Made Just for Humans

The post DIY Recipe: Pretty Puppy Pie Made Just for Humans by Samantha Meyers appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

One of my favorite holiday traditions is baking pies, and there’s no better way to capture the spirit of a warm, dog-loving home than with this perfect puppy- themed pie crust. What I love about this “recipe” is that it isn’t a recipe at all. You can use your favorite pie crust and filling recipes or even a store-bought pie and crust! It’s fully customizable to add a little flair to your favorite baking traditions.

What you’ll need:

  • Your favorite cookie cutters — dog-themed of course! But hearts and other holiday shapes make great additions.
  • Your favorite pie crust, homemade or store bought (no judgment here!). You will need enough for the bottom and to cover the top of your pie.
  • Your favorite pie filling

Directions:

  1. Follow your favorite recipe for your pie crust and filling.
  2. Divide dough in half.
  3. Construct the bottom crust and filling as your recipe instructs.
  4. Roll out the top pie crust, making sure it is thin, but you are able to pick it up. (If dough is too soft, chill until it’s firm enough to roll.)
  5. Using your cookie cutters, cut out shapes for the edges and center of your pie. You can get really creative here, covering as much or as little of the pie as you like and featuring your favorite dog breed and holiday designs.
  6. To make the design pictured here, I used a mix of Dachshunds, mini dog bones and mini hearts around the edge. I then added a variety of dogs — Poodle, Labrador and Schnauzer — for the center.
  7. Arrange cutouts onto your pie.
  8. Bake your pie as instructed.

Samantha Meyers is a dog lover, writer, baker, crafter and Instagrammer. When she’s not writing, she’s decorating cookies at her blog SugaredandIced.com or Instagramming her dogs @FrenchHuggs_ and @Quinnstadoodle.

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you!

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The post DIY Recipe: Pretty Puppy Pie Made Just for Humans by Samantha Meyers appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Thursday, December 13, 2018

Cast Concrete Dog Bowls from HELLO PETS

Cast Concrete Dog Bowls from HELLO PETS

The Sculpture Bowl from HELLO PETS may just be the epitome of “form and function”! Made from cast concrete and sealed with an organic, food-safe sealant, this beauty is both a food and water bowl — and one of the sleekest we’ve seen in a hot minute. Available in one size from HELLO PETS: www.hellopetsshop.com.

Cast Concrete Dog Bowls from HELLO PETS

Cast Concrete Dog Bowls from HELLO PETS

Cast Concrete Dog Bowls from HELLO PETS

Cast Concrete Dog Bowls from HELLO PETS

Cast Concrete Dog Bowls from HELLO PETS


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The Grinch: The Story About the Spirit of Christmas

The post The Grinch: The Story About the Spirit of Christmas by Annie Butler Shirreffs appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

My holiday season isn’t complete without at least one viewing of How the Grinch Stole Christmas. And now there’s something else to look forward to! Illumination and Universal Pictures present The Grinch, based on Dr. Seuss’ beloved classic, which tells the story of the cynical grump who makes it his mission to steal Christmas.

Academy Award nominee Benedict Cumberbatch lends his voice to the infamous Grinch, who lives a solitary life in a cave with only his loyal dog, Max (my favorite character!), for company. This funny, heartwarming and visually stunning movie shares the universal story about the spirit of Christmas and the power of optimism. Get more information at grinchmovie.com.

Thumbnail: Photography Courtesy Illumination Entertainment and Universal Pictures.

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you!

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The post The Grinch: The Story About the Spirit of Christmas by Annie Butler Shirreffs appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Getting to Know and Love The German Shepard Dog (GSD)

The post Getting to Know and Love The German Shepard Dog (GSD) by Allan Reznik appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Alert, fearless, self-confident: Perhaps no breed is more instantly recognizable than the German Shepherd Dog. His heroic feats and high intelligence have earned him universal respect. The GSD will tackle any job with an incredible work ethic. Here are eight facts about this noble breed.

1. The Captain’s vision

Rin Tin Tin was one of the most popular GSD movie stars in history. Photography bum | Alamy Stock Photo.

Rin Tin Tin was one of the most popular GSD movie stars in history. Photography bum | Alamy Stock Photo.

Max Emil Friedrich von Stephanitz was born in 1864 and became known as the father of the German Shepherd Dog. From around the late 1880s to ’90s, Captain von Stephanitz began to standardize the breed. A medium-sized, yellow-and-gray wolflike dog had caught his eye at a dog show in western Germany. The dog was agile and powerful, possessing endurance and intelligence.

He was an able sheepherder who excelled at his job without training. The dog, Hektor Linksrhein, was bought by Captain von Stephanitz, renamed Horand von Grafrath and became the first registered German Shepherd Dog. The Captain established a breed parent club in Germany, became the first president and, in short order, established a type and look in the breed. His motto was “Utility and intelligence.”

For the Captain, beauty meant little if the dog lacked intelligence, temperament and anatomical efficiency. News traveled swiftly around the world and in 1907, the first GSD was exhibited in the United States. The German Shepherd Dog Club of America was established in 1913 with 26 charter members.

2. Temperament foremost

The courage that Captain von Stephanitz felt was the hallmark of the breed was equally prized by the early fanciers who crafted the American breed standard.

It describes the breed as having “a distinct personality marked by direct and fearless, but not hostile, expression, self-confidence and a certain aloofness that does not lend itself to immediate and indiscriminate friendships. The dog must be approachable, quietly standing its ground and showing confidence and willingness to meet overtures without itself making them. It is poised, but when the occasion demands, eager and alert … Lack of confidence under any surroundings is not typical of good character.”

3. A worker for every season

Captain von Stephanitz was impressed by the breed’s ability as a natural sheepherder, requiring only direction, no training. The GSD can still perform admirably in this capacity but is versatile enough to excel in so many other areas. His achievements as a service and war dog are legion.

The breed makes an excellent guide dog for the blind, police dog and search-and-rescue dog. As a guard dog and companion, he is unmatched. Whatever the task, the GSD rises to the occasion.

4. World politics in the breed

After World War I, anything associated with the name “German” fell out of favor, and people did everything possible to disassociate themselves with the name and the country. Many countries and kennel clubs changed the name of the breed to distance themselves from the negative feelings that a reference to Germany would harbor.

In 1917 the American Kennel Club decreed the elimination of the word “German” and the breed was known thereafter as the Shepherd Dog. That policy remained in place until May 19, 1930 when members of the Shepherd Dog Club of America voted to change the name to the German Shepherd Dog Club of America.

In England, Ireland and many other European countries the name of the GSD was changed to “Alsatian” (from the Alsace-Lorraine region). England has since returned to the name GSD although some nations still cling to Alsatian.

5. Harsh, double coat wanted

This breed is known for shedding, so frequent brushing is recommended. Photography ©Charlotte Reeves Photography.

This breed is known for shedding, so frequent brushing is recommended. Photography ©Charlotte Reeves Photography.

The AKC breed standard calls for a double coat of medium length, as dense as possible, the hair straight, harsh and lying close to the body. Although long-coated GSDs are seen, the breed standard considers long coats a fault, along with soft, silky, woolly or curly coats. The breed sheds heavily, so frequent brushing is recommended.

6. A coat of many colors

Although the breed comes in assorted colors, the standard specifies that strong, rich colors and patterns are preferred. Black-and-tan dogs are the most frequently seen, along with sables and solid blacks. Washed-out, dilute colors like blue and liver are serious faults. White Shepherds may compete in AKC obedience, agility and other performance events but are disqualified in the conformation show ring.

7. GSDs on the big screen

While we have our Lassies, Beethovens and Benjis to entertain us, no other breed has had as many canine stars on the big (and small) screen as the GSD. In addition to the timeless Rin Tin Tin (with his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame), the movies have been graced, over the decades, by the heroic exploits of Ace, Bullet, Jerry Lee, London, Ranger, Rusty, Sandow, Strongheart and Wolfheart.

8. Celebrity GSD owners

Owners of the German Shepherd Dog are as loyal as their dogs, and that includes many celebrity owners. Among the stars who live with a GSD are Jake Gyllenhaal, Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Lopez, Kristen Stewart, Miley Cyrus, Taylor Lautner, Claudia Schiffer, Jennifer Aniston, Enrique Iglesias, Meryl Davis, Shania Twain, Ben Affleck, Tom Hanks and Bo Derek.

Thumbnail: Photography ©Charlotte Reeves Photography.

About the author

Allan Reznik is a journalist, editor and broadcaster who specializes in dog-related subjects. He is the former editor-in-chief of Dogs in Review and former editor of Dog Fancy magazine. A city dweller all his life, on both coasts, he now enjoys the rural South with his Afghan Hounds, Tibetan Spaniels and assorted rescues.

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you!

Why read breed profiles?

Dog breed profiles help everyone, whether you have a mixed breed or purebred dog, to better understand and improve the quality of your dog’s life. If you have a mixed breed dog, read up on all of the breed profiles that make up your dog. Not sure what breed your dog is? There are a number of easy DNA tests out there to help your find out.

Thumbnail: Photography ©chris-mueller | Getty Images.

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The post Getting to Know and Love The German Shepard Dog (GSD) by Allan Reznik appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Holidays and Dogs: Keep Your Pup Happy at Every Age

The post Holidays and Dogs: Keep Your Pup Happy at Every Age by Audrey Pavia appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Two years ago, I did something I always advise others not to do this time of year: I adopted a puppy. I’d been thinking about getting another dog but had no intention of doing it during the holidays. I had gift buying to do, parties coming up and a long car trip to my cousins’ house on Christmas Day. But a week before Christmas, while buying cat litter at the pet supply store, I fell in love with a little black puppy who was up for adoption. I took him home that day. It was quite the hassle trying to fit little 9-week-old Mookie into our holiday plans, but it did give me the chance to really pamper him in a very special way. Holidays and dogs don’t have to be a stressful. If you’re lucky enough to have a puppy, adult or senior dog in your life this holiday season, you can do a lot to make him feel special.

Holidays and puppies

A puppy with a holiday gift.

The holidays pose tons of safety issues for dogs — especially puppies. Photography © Smitt | Thinkstock.

Any dog under the age of a year old is considered a puppy, and it’s easy to see why. Young dogs are playful, full of energy and always up for new adventures. Use the holidays as a time to pamper your pup by giving him the vital socialization that every pup needs. The experiences he has at this stage of his life will shape his future.

  • Take him on outings. Make him part of the festivities while also getting him some exercise and socialization. Bring him with you to watch a tree lighting, or take him with you on an evening stroll through the neighborhood to look at Christmas lights. If you’ve got snow on the ground, find a fenced-in area and let him help you build a snowman.
  • Introduce him to guests. Use guests as an opportunity to give your pup positive experiences with new people. Ask guests to greet your pup with a treat so he associates visitors with something good. Dog lovers who come over may even be willing to go outside and play with your pup, tossing him a toy he can catch and return. If children are part of the festivities, ask them to help you socialize your pup by letting them feed and play with him. Supervise all of your pup’s interactions with children, as you want the experience to be positive for everyone.
  • Keep him safe. The holidays can be full of hazards for young dogs. If your puppy is still in the chewing stage, make sure he can’t get ahold of holiday decorations, gift-wrapping accessories and kids’ toys. Strings of lights can be particularly hazardous to a puppy, who can get burned or electrocuted if he gnaws on the cord.

Holidays and adult dogs

Your adult dog has seen a few holidays come and go and may be used to the hustle and bustle. He may even feel a bit neglected because you’re so busy with shopping and preparing for company. This year, make it special for him while also taking care to keep him safe.

  • Buy holiday gifts for your dog. If you’ve never watched a dog open his own gifts on Christmas or Hanukkah, you don’t know what you’re missing. Buy him a few new toys or treats, wrap them like you would any gift, then help him open the first one when it’s time. If your pooch is like most dogs, he’ll figure it out quickly and will be tearing at the paper to get at the next gift.
  • Watch the treats. Though you might be tempted to share your holiday meal with your dog, keep him away from rich foods. They will upset his digestive system (and may cause a bout of holiday diarrhea) and, in the case of certain foods like onions and chocolate, can cause serious illness. If you want to pamper him by giving him a taste of some of your holiday food, limit it to a small amount of turkey, chicken or lean meat served with his regular dinner.
  • Keep him close. When friends and relatives come over to spend the holidays with you, warn them not to leave doors or gates open. To be on the safe side, make sure your dog is wearing a collar with an ID tag bearing your name, address and phone number in the event he should get out.

Holidays and senior dogs

Santa with a dog during the holidays.

Senior dogs might be a bit calmer about posing for holiday photos. Photography © kingpics | Thinkstock.

Senior dogs know the drill around the holidays, and many try to stay out of the way with all the commotion going on. Because of this, it can be easy for them to get lost in the shuffle. Give your older dog some extra attention to let him know you still love him this time of year by making him a special part of the holidays.

  • Dress him up. Pet product retailers go crazy offering all kinds of holiday apparel for dogs at the holidays. Canine Christmas sweaters are particularly popular and come in all kinds of styles, colors and patterns. If you have a sweater-loving dog, this is the time of year to spend some money on a too-cute holiday sweater.
  • If your pooch isn’t the sweater type, you can still dress him up with a holiday collar. Glitter, jingle bells, Christmasy bows and an assortment of other cheery decorations adorn holiday dog collars these days.
  • You might also want to dress him up with a holiday bandanna. My senior Aussie-mix, Candy, gets to wear a kerchief adorned with turkeys and pumpkins on Thanksgiving and a blue one covered with white snowflakes at Christmastime.
  • Take your dog’s photo. Plenty of pet stores and grooming shops offer pet photos with Santa. Dress your senior dog up in holiday cheer with a special collar, sweater or bandanna, and have his photo taken with old St. Nick. Or, if you like to send holiday greeting cards that include a family portrait, include your senior dog in this year’s photo. Doll him up for the occasion, and help him feel like he’s an important member of the family.

Thumbnail: Photography © Ljupco | Thinkstock.

This piece was originally published in 2017.

An award-winning writer and editor, Audrey Pavia is a former managing editor of Dog Fancy magazine and former senior editor of The AKC Gazette. She is the author of The Labrador Retriever Handbook (Barrons) and has written extensively on horses as well as other pets. She shares her home in Norco, California, with two rescue dogs, Candy and Mookie.

Editor’s note: This article appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you

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The post Holidays and Dogs: Keep Your Pup Happy at Every Age by Audrey Pavia appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

4 Dog-Friendly Holiday Recipes That Humans Can Eat, Too

The post 4 Dog-Friendly Holiday Recipes That Humans Can Eat, Too by Samantha Meyers appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

The holidays are a time for friends, family and food. We can think of no better way to get into the spirit of the season than by making these dog-friendly holiday recipes. that humans can eat, too.

Dog-Friendly Turkey Stew Recipe

Create a Holiday Meal for Dogs and Humans

Cook up a hearty turkey stew that’s good for both dogs and humans.

Thick, hearty, and packed with vegetables, this warm and versatile winter stew is a dish that will quickly become a tradition for you and your dog. Use up your holiday leftovers with this great recipe.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds cooked turkey meat, chopped into 2-inch pieces
  • 3 1⁄2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or stock
  • 1 pound white or yellow potatoes, peeled and chopped into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 pound carrots, peeled and chopped into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 small butternut squash, peeled and chopped into 2-inch pieces
  • 2 sprigs each, rosemary and thyme, leaves removed from the stem
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1 cup frozen green beans

Don’t have one of the veggies listed? No problem! You can use any dog-friendly veggie you have in your fridge.

Directions

  1. Put potatoes, carrots, squash, and herbs in a large pot and cover with the chicken broth. Bring to a boil, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes or until veggies are tender.
  2. Add frozen peas, green beans, and chopped turkey and simmer for another 10 minutes.
  3. Allow to cool and thicken before serving to your dog. For humans, season with salt and pepper to taste.

Dog-Friendly Cranberry-Apple Crisp Recipe

Cranberry-apple crisp for dogs and humans.

Cranberry-apple crisp for dogs and humans.

Fruit can be hard to come by this time of year and eating plain apples can get a little boring. Cooking apples brings out their natural sweetness, and the tang from the cranberries will add a little zing and color to your holiday table.

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 6 medium apples, peeled and chopped into 2-inch pieces
  • 12-ounce bag of fresh cranberries
  • 1⁄2 cup water
  • 1⁄2 cup honey

Topping

  • 1 cup quick-cooking oats
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon ginger

Directions

  1. Place all sauce ingredients into a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes. You can eat the sauce as is, but if you want to take it to the next level, add the topping.
  2. Mix all ingredients for the topping in a small bowl. Scoop sauce into ramekins and sprinkle the oat mixture on top. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 5 to 10 minutes, until topping is brown.
  3. Cool before serving to your pup, but humans can eat it warm and add a scoop of ice cream.

Dog-Friendly Gingerbread Cookies Recipe

Gingerbread cookies for dogs and humans.

Gingerbread cookies for dogs and humans.

Nothing puts the feeling of holidays in the air like the smell of gingerbread baking. These cookies will delight your dog’s senses!

Ingredients

  • 1 1⁄2 cups whole wheat flour l 1 1⁄2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1⁄2 cup molasses
  • 1⁄2 cup water
  • 1⁄4 cup vegetable oil

Directions

  1. Mix flours and spices in a bowl. Add the molasses, oil, and water. Mix until combined. Add additional water or flour as needed so the dough comes together in a ball and is moist, but not sticky.
  2. Roll out dough to ¼ inch thick. Use your favorite cookie cutters to cut out the cookies. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes.
  3. For the humans: Dogs don’t need much sugar, but for yourself a little icing will add the perfect sweet touch.

Dog-Friendly Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe

A classic holiday treat, this version celebrates the natural sweetness of sweet potatoes and the rich, creamy flavor of coconut. This recipe smells heavenly while it’s baking!

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds sweet potatoes, baked with skins removed
  • 1⁄2 cup lite coconut milk
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 1⁄2 tablespoons maple syrup l 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon ginger
  • 1⁄2 cup shredded coconut

Directions

  1. Place the potatoes in a bowl and mash with a fork until smooth. Add cinnamon, ginger, coconut milk, maple syrup, and eggs. Mix well.
  2. Spoon mixture into a baking dish or pie plate.
  3. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 35 minutes. Sprinkle with coconut.
  4. Cool before serving to your dog.

Short on time? Leave out the eggs and skip the baking for a rich and delicious mashed sweet potato.

Tell us: What dog-friendly / human-friendly recipes do you make?

This post was originally published in 2017.

Read more about dogs and holidays on Dogster.com:

The post 4 Dog-Friendly Holiday Recipes That Humans Can Eat, Too by Samantha Meyers appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.