Friday, October 19, 2018

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

First off, Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. is one of the coolest concepts I’ve come across recently. Based in Colorado, Winnie Lou is first and foremost a food truck and mobile pop-up shop for dogs (!!!) that just so happens to also have a great online shop. They travel around to local breweries and bars, special events, festivals, and more bringing their tasty goodies and love of dogs with them. (If you live in Colorado, you can find out where they’ll be next right here.)

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

If you don’t live in Colorado, you can still buy their delicious treats online. Of course, their online shop has much more to offer than just treats! The Winnie Lou shop is a wonderfully curated collection of stylish dog essentials including collars and leads, one-of-a-kind ceramic bowls, toys, beds, grooming supplies and more. In addition, they also spread the love around by donating a portion of their proceeds to a different canine-related nonprofit each quarter. How rad is that?

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

Check out all the Winnie Lou goodness and learn more about this pawesome company at www.winnielou.com.

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop

Winnie Lou: The Canine Co. Dog Food Truck and Shop


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© 2018 Dog Milk | Posted by capree in Beds + Furniture, Collars + Leads, Dining, Other, Toys, Travel | Permalink | No comments

Are These Halloween Dangers for Dogs Lurking in Your Home?

The post Are These Halloween Dangers for Dogs Lurking in Your Home? by Marybeth Bittel appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Halloween harbors a host of frightfully funny sights and sounds, especially for pet lovers: Beagles crooning along with golden oldies like “Monster Mash.” Chihuahuas dressed up as Bruno Mars, sporting miniature guitars and indignant expressions that seem to proclaim, “Let It Go.” Unfortunately, many common trick-or-treat activities aren’t so entertaining. They can prompt pet panic attacks, pancreatitis and even poisoning. But never fear: This handy checklist of Halloween dangers for dogs will arm you against terrifying surprises, so your furkids stay safe and secure.

1. Halloween candy is toxic to dogs

A dog with a Halloween pumpkin wig on.

Halloween candy is among one of many Halloween dangers for dogs. Photography © WilleeCole | Thinkstock.

Chocolate scores high on many kids’ lists of #HalloweenGoals. Unfortunately, chocolate is also highly toxic to dogs. That’s because it contains both caffeine and theobromine, which are tough for furry friends to process.

“Theobromine and caffeine are known as methylxanthines,” explains Melissa Behrens, DVM, a veterinarian at Animal Hospital at the Shores in Lake Barrington, Illinois. “Dogs are far more sensitive to methylxanthines than people, and different types of chocolate contain varying amounts. In general, though, the darker and more bitter the chocolate, the greater the danger.”

To help Fido celebrate fearlessly, consider carob-flavored treats. They have the outward appearance of chocolate — but in occasional, nibble-sized quantities, they’re safer for four-legged friends to ingest.

According to the Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) run by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), grapes and raisins can be dangerous nibbles as well. Both have caused kidney damage in certain canines. Because the exact reason for this documented reaction is still being studied, it’s best to keep these tasty tidbits far from furry friends.

Xylitol, a non-caloric sweetener used in certain gums and candy products, is another worrisome culprit. “Xylitol ingestion can cause a large amount of insulin to be released by a dog’s pancreas, resulting in hypoglycemia or low blood sugar,” warns Elisa Katz, DVM, a veterinarian and certified canine rehabilitation therapist at Natural Pet Holistic Veterinary Center in Bourbonnais, Illinois. “This is an emergency that can lead to confusion, uncoordinated behavior, weakness, seizures and even death.”

“Always read your labels,” cautions Dr. Behrens, “and remember that dogs have great noses! They’ll sneak into purses or bags if they smell something sweet.”

2. Candles and décor are Halloween dangers for dogs

It’s sometimes easy to forget that when placed on a table and lit, fall-scented candles are approximately pet-high. The same goes for miniature tapers and tea lights positioned inside carved pumpkins, too.

Larger dogs may even fling their front paws onto mantels and ledges to catch a closer whiff, thereby causing a fire. No matter how small, any seasonal item that emits a flame should be kept well away from canines. Remember this simple rhyme: “Wagging tails and glowing wicks; these are things that never mix.”

3. Festive Halloween food and drinks could cause issues

Halloween is a time when larger-than-average groups converge inside homes for themed parties and scary movie binge-watching. So, it pays to set firm house rules when it comes to feeding the family pooch.

As noted above, anything that contains caffeine could potentially prove fatal. That includes pumpkin-spiced lattes, mulled tea, hot cocoa, cola — and even coffee grounds. And feeding high-fat treats and trimmings from the holiday buffet table could prompt sudden pancreatitis flare-ups. Keep all these items far from questing noses.

4. Cool-weather chemicals are toxic to dogs

When outdoor temperatures begin to plummet, some people start using rodenticides to discourage pesky critter infestations. Similarly, late autumn is a common time to begin adding antifreeze to the family car. Don’t forget, these poisonous chemicals can easily kill a canine.

“The toxic ingredient in antifreeze is a potent alcohol called ethylene glycol,” observes Dr. Behrens. “Unfortunately, many pets will drink this sweet-tasting fluid if it’s spilled on the ground, or left out in the open. Some brands add bittering agents, but this won’t deter every dog.”

Dr. Katz concurs. “Ethylene glycol is metabolized to various acidic substances,” she explains. “Ingesting even small amounts can result in an acidosis of the body — leading to a buildup of irreversible calcium oxalate crystals and mineralization of the kidneys.”

Only use these types of household products with tremendous caution — and clean up any spills immediately. Both vets agree that antifreeze consumption should always be treated as an extreme emergency requiring rapid medical attention.

5. Pumpkin beers spell out trouble for dogs

Some owners think it’s super-cute to let their pooch have a few slurps of beer. Unfortunately, ingesting even minute amounts of alcoholic beverages — and flavored coffee syrups, too — can lead to doggie digestive upset, liver issues or organ damage. Remember that a canine’s organs are much smaller than a human’s, and prone to faster impairment.

For a non-alcoholic alternative that lets your pup party away, consider a low-sodium broth or a broth-based, meat-flavored pet beverage like Bowser Beer.

6. Doorbells ringing are scary to dogs

A dog in a ghost costume.

Ringing doorbells might spell out anxiety for some dogs. Photography © fotoedu | Thinkstock.

Many pups put doorbells right at the top of their terror lists. A loud, abrupt noise that proclaims the entry of unfamiliar strangers? It’s not hard to understand why this might be upsetting. For pets who associate that familiar “ding-dong” sound with something dire, swaddling can sometimes relieve excess anxiety.

The principal is similar for both canines and human newborns. Recognized Soviet physiologist Dr. Konstantin Buteyko and his colleagues have explained that swaddling can ease and prevent hyperventilation from the upper chest area. It creates a sort of systemic feedback loop: Breathing begins to issue from the lower diaphragm; smaller volumes of air are inhaled; and overall respiration slows to create a calmed feeling.

Commercial products like the Thundershirt were designed around this swaddling dynamic, and they’re readily available at most pet stores.

7. Trick-or-treaters and stranger-danger guests mean Halloween frights for dogs

Speaking of doorbells, let’s talk strangers and visitors. Pets instinctively guard their own territory. So, it can be extremely upsetting when an endless parade of giggling ghosts and goblins visit… or worse, head straight into the house accompanied by loud music and strobing lights.

“This loud, high-energy environment can cause anxious pets to escape right out the door of their homes,” notes Dr. Behrens. Dr. Katz agrees that panicky pets who bolt could get lost, abducted and even hit by a car.

If you host Halloween revelers in your home — in any capacity — be extra-sensitive to your pet’s needs.

It’s often best and safest to let your pooch hunker down in a secure, quiet room away from the action. In pronounced cases of anxiety, an overnight stay at a reputable boarding facility or with a trusted family member, friend or sitter can give furry friends a reassuring break.

As an added seasonal precaution, it’s always smart to keep the number of your local vet and emergency clinic close at hand. Also, remember the hotline for the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center: (888) 426-4435. If anything unexpected happens, consult these resources without delay. Here’s wishing you and your pet a safe, secure and ghoulishly good time this Halloween!

Thumbnail: Photography © damedeeso | Thinkstock. 

This piece was originally published in 2017.

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The post Are These Halloween Dangers for Dogs Lurking in Your Home? by Marybeth Bittel appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

How to Stop Toy Guarding in Puppies

The post How to Stop Toy Guarding in Puppies by Victoria Stilwell appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Most dogs love their toys, but sometimes they love them just a little too much. Toy guarding and hoarding behaviors are very common. So, what’s acceptable and what isn’t? And what can you do about it?

Toy guarding — what’s normal

A confused or scared looking puppy with a toy.

Some amount of toy guarding IS normal. Photography ©Mexitographer | Getty Images.

It’s normal for dogs to hide their toys or bones as if they’re saving them for later, and it’s even normal in dogs who have an abundance of toys available to them at all times. If you would like these behaviors to stop, however, try limiting the amount of toys and bones your dog has access to at a given time. You’ll likely see the hoarding behavior lessen as your dog relaxes because there is not as much of a “surplus” to hide.

When to be concerned about toy guarding

Now, if your dog is resource-guarding toys (growling, snapping or biting if you try to take them away), this is a different matter altogether. Resource guarding, whether it involves food, toys or even a human, is rooted in a dog’s instinctual need for safety and survival. In the mind of a resource-guarding dog, the people or other dogs in the household represent a threat, causing the dog to guard objects to keep himself safe and comfortable.

If I walked up to you and tried to steal your car keys, your wallet and your cellphone, I would be taking away the key elements you need for your safety and survival. Would you happily hand those items over to me, or would you be frightened or angry at the thought of losing them? We alarm our cars and our homes in order to protect our resources; why can’t a dog do the same in his own way?

Unfortunately, there’s a pervasive myth that resource guarding is the result of a dog trying to exert dominance. As a result, well-meaning pet parents believe they need to be confrontational with their resource-guarding dogs in order to gain “control” over them and force them into submission. But because the behavior is actually rooted in insecurity, and the dog feeling unsafe or unsure in his environment, this approach is highly dangerous and ineffective, often leading to the behavior getting worse. A confrontational approach only serves to validate the dog’s insecurity and can get people snapped at or bitten.

What to do about toy guarding

A boy and a dog fighting over a toy.

You can prevent toy aggression from developing in the first place! Photography ©MediaProduction | Getty Images.

A great way to prevent toy aggression from ever developing, or to help improve the problem once it has already started, is to remove confrontation from the equation and make dropping toys a fun and stress-free game instead.

Teach your dog to “take it” by rewarding him for picking up a toy, then providing him with a trade, presenting another toy from behind your back and directing his interest onto the new toy while you play with it. When your dog drops the original toy, immediately praise and reward with the second toy, eventually adding the words “drop it.”

The key is to make that second toy infinitely more interesting than the first. Soon you will be seen as the giver of exciting new toys, rather than the person who comes to take away valued objects. Not only will you eliminate confrontation and avoid being bitten, you’ll also be building up a great bond with your dog in the process.

The bottom line on toy guarding

Resource guarding is a difficult behavior to cope with, especially if you have young children or live in a multi-dog household, but focus on what you want from your dog, rather than correcting for the behaviors you do not want. You’ll find that your dog is eager to learn and will trust you to provide him with a safe, low-stress environment where he does not feel the need to guard or protect things of value.

Thumbnail: Photography ©dageldog | Getty Images.

About the author

Victoria Stilwell, dog trainer, TV personality, author and public speaker, is best known as the star of the TV series It’s Me or the Dog, through which she reaches audiences in more than 100 countries. Appearing frequently in the media, she’s widely recognized as a leader in the field of animal behavior, is editor-in-chief of positively.com, CEO of the VSPDT network of licensed trainers and the founder of the Victoria Stilwell Academy for Dog Training & Behavior — the leader in dog trainer education. Connect with her on Facebook or Twitter at @victorias.

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The post How to Stop Toy Guarding in Puppies by Victoria Stilwell appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

All About the Perro de Presa Canario

The post All About the Perro de Presa Canario by Allan Reznik appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

There are a few large working breeds whose fearless guardian traits are so pronounced that canine experts would never recommend them for the average home. Two such dogs are the Fila Brasileiro (Brazilian Mastiff) and the Perro de Presa Canario (Canary Island Dog of Prey). In the right, experienced hands, and given a job to do, they can serve their owners well, but their strength, dominant temperament and potential for aggression make them completely inappropriate for most situations. Let’s learn more about the Perro de Presa Canario here.

Meet the Perro de Presa Canario — the Mastiff of the Canary Islands

Perro de Presa Canario.

Perro de Presa Canario. Photography ©Marko_Marcello | Getty Images.

The burly Perro de Presa Canario hails from the same islands as the sweet songbird and popular pet. Originally bred for working livestock, Perro de Presa Canario is Spanish and means “Canarian catch dog,” often shortened to Presa Canario or simply Presa. The breed is also known as the Dogo Canario, meaning Canarian Molosser.

In addition to its role as a cattle dog, Presas were used for dog fighting until the 1950s. Although the prohibition of dog fighting was ordered throughout the islands in the 1940s, the activity secretly continued for the next decade. With the introduction of the German Shepherd Dog, the Doberman Pinscher and the Great Dane to the islands, interest in the Presa dropped off significantly, almost causing the breed’s demise. In the early 1970s, a few committed breeders made a concerted effort to revive the Presa, citing it as a rustic, functional dog with highly prized watchdog instincts, territorial and courageous.

Perro de Presa Canario traits

The Presa’s appearance is that of a typical molosser, with a broad, massive and square head; a thick, muscular body and rectangular profile. The ears are typically cropped, not only to give a more formidable expression but also to protect the dog from harm while working with cattle.

Height ranges from 22 to 26 inches; weight from 84 to 110 pounds; and the short coat, which is slightly coarse to the touch, comes in all shades of fawn and brindle, with a black face mask.

Perro de Presa Canario temperament

The Fédération Cynologique Internationale breed standard, translated from the country of origin, describes the Perro de Presa Canario as having a “calm appearance; attentive expression. Especially suited to guarding and traditionally used for herding cattle … Low and deep bark. Obedient and docile with family members, very devoted to its master, but can be suspicious of strangers.”

Breed bans

Given the pronounced aggression that is so much a part of both the Fila and the Perro de Presa Canario, many countries have banned their importation, ownership and breeding.

In Fiji, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Norway, Malta and Cyprus, it is illegal to own a Fila without specific exemption from a court. In certain states of Australia, the Fila is a restricted breed. Imports are also prohibited.

Importation and sale of the Perro de Presa Canario is prohibited in Australia and New Zealand.

Thumbnail: Photography © Paul Fearn | Alamy Stock Photo.

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Dogster magazine. Have you seen the new Dogster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting room of your vet’s office? Subscribe now to get Dogster magazine delivered straight to you!

About the author:

Allan Reznik is a journalist, editor and broadcaster who specializes in dog-related subjects. He is the former editor-in-chief of Dogs in Review and former editor of Dog Fancy magazine. A city dweller all his life, on both coasts, he now enjoys the rural South with his Afghan Hounds, Tibetan Spaniels and assorted rescues.

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The post All About the Perro de Presa Canario by Allan Reznik appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Spooky Peanut Butter Banana Dog Treats

The post Spooky Peanut Butter Banana Dog Treats by Susan Rogers appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Bake your dog something scary-tasty this Halloween with this recipe for Spooky Peanut Butter Banana Dog Treats from Posh Celebrations.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups rolled oats
  • 2 bananas
  • 1 cup peanut butter (no salt, no sugar, no xylitol or preservatives)

Recipe

Spooky Peanut Butter Banana Dog Treats.

Spooky Peanut Butter Banana Dog Treats.

  1. Place rolled oats in food processor, and grind into flakes.
  2. In a bowl, beat together bananas and peanut butter until smooth with a mixer, then add oat flakes, and mix well.
  3. If the dough is too dry, add more peanut butter. If too sticky, add more oat flakes.
  4. Roll out dough on a floured surface to 1⁄4- inch thickness and cut out shapes using a mini cookie cutter (e.g., “spooky cat,” ghost or pumpkin).
  5. Place cut shapes 2 inches apart on a greased cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit about 10 minutes until lightly browned. Cool on a baking rack and store in refrigerator. (Makes 3 dozen treats.)

Find recipes, games and other pet party planning ideas in Posh Celebrations

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The post Spooky Peanut Butter Banana Dog Treats by Susan Rogers appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

New Modern Dog Sweaters from Dusen Dusen

New Modern Dog Sweaters from Dusen Dusen

Brand spankin’ new dog sweaters from one of our favorite brands just dropped this week and we are stoked. Dusen Dusen’s latest designs maintain their signature focus on color, movement, and contrast with four new patterns just for dogs. (Be sure to check out their for humans collections, too, as well as homewares!) Arc, Block, Rocks, and Dot are the new aptly-named styles. Each is handmade from 100% alpaca and available in four sizes. Shop all available designs at www.dusendusen.com.

New Modern Dog Sweaters from Dusen Dusen

New Modern Dog Sweaters from Dusen Dusen

New Modern Dog Sweaters from Dusen Dusen


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© 2018 Dog Milk | Posted by capree in Clothing | Permalink | No comments

Can You Use Human OTC Eye Drops as Eye Drops for Dogs?

The post Can You Use Human OTC Eye Drops as Eye Drops for Dogs? by Melvin Peña appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

One morning last summer, I spotted a troubling green discharge in the corner of my dog, Baby’s, right eye. I spend the best part of each day thinking, researching and writing about other dog owners’ canine health and behavior questions. Weirdly, this means I often take my own dog’s hardiness and well-being for granted. For several heartbeats, I experienced the same mixture of indecision and panic that I imagine drives most dog owners straight to use their own human eye drops as eye drops for dogs.

I’ve written enough about dog eyes to recognize the verdant hue of the sludge accumulating in Baby’s eye should be a source of concern. I didn’t know what the problem was, but I marched instinctively to see what over-the-counter eye wash I might have to try and deal with it. Should I reach for Visine or whatever human eye wash or ointment I might have ready at hand? Can human eye drops be used as eye drops for dogs?

For simple dog eye problems, a simple solution

A closeup of a dog eye.

Can you use human OTC eye drops as eye drops for dogs? Photography ©fotokate | iStock / Getty Images Plus.

If you’re reading this, then we’ve both remembered that Google can be our friend and ally. Reading through a number of trustworthy sites, I began to see the same solution: a simple, no-frills, saline solution that is applied with nothing more complex than cotton balls. Over the course of a few days, Baby’s right eye cleared up, and the sleep that accumulated in the corners of her eyes took on their customary white coloration. There was no need for medicated eye drops.

The easiest or most convenient choices, the medicated OTC eye drops and ointments you keep at home, are not the best things to use as eye drops for dogs! In fact, using these as eye drops for dogs can exacerbate the issues at hand, or create new ones that may ultimately cost you more at the vet’s office or cause your dog needless additional pain. Let’s take a look at three of the most common dog eye problems for which you might need to use eye drops for dogs:

  1. Dog eye infection
  2. Conjunctivitis in dogs
  3. Dog eye allergies

1. Treating a dog eye infection

Minor dog eye infections can arise from any number of causes. My dog doesn’t have long hair on her head, and there was no prolapse of the eyelid, so I could rule out hair as a potential irritants as well as cherry eye. It was a hot and dry summer, and there was plenty of loose sand at the park when we hiked. Any kind of foreign body, down to a stray piece of dust blowing into her eye and getting caught there, might’ve led her eyes to produce green discharge.

Couldn’t you just use your basic human over-the-counter eye drops as eye drops for dogs? Well, the active ingredient in Visine is Tetrahydozoline hydrochloride, which narrows the eye’s blood vessels. If your object is to dislodge a bit of mobile debris from your dog’s eye, drugs of any kind are not called for. Use human eye treatments only if and when you get veterinary approval. If you have half an hour or so, you can even make your own saline eye wash for a true home remedy!

2. Conjunctivitis in dogs

Baby’s eyes are always a little red or pink when she first wakens from a long nap or first thing in the morning, so it’s not usually a reason to get anxious. The most common form of pink eye in dogs is serous conjunctivitis, also called “dry eye.” Similar to the kind of eye infection described above — and frequently a cause of it— is an environmental irritant that prevents a dog’s eye from producing the tears needed to flush it out naturally. There was no swelling or inflammation in Baby’s eye, and the greenish goo was inconsistent with pink eye.

You might be tempted, as I was, to grab your own over-the-counter eye drops out of instinct or force of habit. According to Dr. Kathryn Primm, however, “you will have done nothing to address the reason” for the dog’s ocular discomfort. Basic saline solution and cotton balls, the kinds you can get for about $4 to $5 total at your nearest drug store, constitute a safe and reliable preliminary approach. If the symptoms persist, the discharge takes on the look or scent of pus, and you notice your dog pawing at their face frequently, seek a vet’s advice before turning to medicated eye drops for dogs — or any sorts of washes or ointments.

3. Dealing with dog eye allergies

As Dogster‘s own resident veterinarian, Dr. Eric Barchas has written, “allergies are not a terribly common cause of eye problems in dogs.” Nonetheless, they can occur, and, like my own dog’s eye health issue, tend to be most frequent in the summer months. Like the two conditions we’ve described above, inflammation, redness and watery discharge in one or both of a dog’s eyes might be the result of an environmental allergen or irritant.

Dr. Barchas also notes that the vast majority of canine allergies are, in the first place, caused by fleas, and, in the second, manifest themselves in irritated skin and relentless scratching. Have you started using a different kind of cleaner in the house? Just switched to a scented cat litter in a room where your dog also spends time? Did you just give your dog a bath using a new shampoo? For dogs dealing with a newly arisen eye problem, try to rule out external causes before potentially causing the dog extra difficulties with medicated eye drops or washes.

The bottom line: Don’t use your eye drops as eye drops for dogs and consult a vet with questions!

After three years of writing about dog health issues, I’ve learned two essential things that every dog owner should internalize at the earliest opportunity: Take a moment every day to really look at your dog. During one stretch, I did so many pieces on dog digestive problems, that I made a habit of watching Baby poop as a barometer of her overall health. It wasn’t until I noticed the warning signs of a possible eye infection that I started doing a quick check on her ocular health every morning, too.

The second: Human medications, even “baby” or “child” varieties of popular, name-brand, over-the-counter formulas, can do more harm than good to our dogs. For any minor health issue lasting two days or fewer, there is almost always a simpler, non-medicinal solution that dog owners can turn to. If there’s a longer-term problem your dog is dealing with, or one you fear is developing, your dog’s vet will be glad to suggest the proper eye drops for dogs or eye medications for dogs — ointments, wipes, antibiotics or whatever is prudent— and their proper usage, or direct you to a canine ophthalmologist!

Having trouble giving your dog eye medication? Head here for tips >>

Thumbnail: Photography by fotoedu/Thinkstock.

This piece was originally published in 2017.

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The post Can You Use Human OTC Eye Drops as Eye Drops for Dogs? by Melvin Peña appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.